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20121001
20121031
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WJLA (ABC) 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
the area was devastated last year during hurricane irene. they have many areas closed including highway 12, which goes through the outer banks on to the cape hatteras national seashore. and the bonner bridge is closed. the surf is very strong. water getting all the way to appear. the sea ranch resort at among the areas affected. we are getting pictures from wtop. they have a reporter where more than 200 flights are closed. the southwest terminal they have the monitors wrapped up in plastic in augenstwein. we will have an update a little later on. back to you. >> thank you. we will check back with you shortly for the latest. it4:>> coming up, we will talk with a spokesperson for metro [ male announcer ] pillsbury grands biscuits. delicious. busay i press a few out flat... add some beef sloppy joe sauce... and cheese fo it all up and boom! i just made an unbeatable unsloppy joe pillsbury grands biscuits. let the making begin. [ female announcer ] what would you call an ordinary breakfast
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look innd where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than so
quickly to change positions. already we've had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we're being told that protectively they'll shut off power down here soon so we hope everybody has gotten somewhere safe. sandy is coming. the question is, how will new york city handle it? the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town. wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first timing since the 1800s in a place where you have to look up to see where many live, skyscrapers are a concern. wind speeds on the ground are half those on the top floors. sometimes forcing buildings to sway. >> the further up you live the more reason you should close your drapes and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watch this bath water slosh in a brookline high-rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an hour. half what's expected from sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teams worked to latch down machinery. fears heightened by that ten-ton steel arm dangling from a high-rise building. but the main thr
are in pretty bad trouble. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines as the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: the streets are crackling not with panic but with with an upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? >> reporter: got to admire her spirit. one piece of breaking news from here in new york. we just learned that the stock market will be closed tomorrow. there were concerns if they tried to stay open, they might lose power during the course of the day. back to you. >> and a few people over your shoulder still getting into the subway. dan harri
to prevent any glass from shattering. we have seen a lot of tape on the glass. they had irene hurricane isabel in 2003. anytime there is a big storm coming through this area, you check right here. to give you an idea of what businesses have done, you see that they have taken off the glass. not a mandatory evacuation. they are calling on merchants to move from the area today. you have the bay bridge. many of the anne arundel county officials are advising people to stay off the streets. it is early in the morning, but we have not seen any traffic. >> thanks very much. a lot of people traveling today. we talked about the airport staying open with limited flights. >> we have christina joining us from amtrak early this morning. >> good morning. >> i understand that the northeast corridor service is completely cancelled? >> that is correct. for all trains in the northeast corridor are cancelled. >> what is the prediction as we move forward? looking ahead, doesn't look like there is any likelihood of service be restored for tomorrow or wednesday? >> we do not have an estimate for service rest
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the city and shut down the subway system. as sandy barrels north, the city's more than 7 million str
yesterday. it's important to have as many in place before the storm swept in. we learned that from irene. we have about 1300 dedicated men and women right now for the restoration. that does not include those working on secondary, such as myself, people working 24-7. customer service, outside and inside, we are working in preparation for a storm. >> power outages are such a sensitive subject in this area, especially after the derecho. how will the response be different this time? >> it will be different because it started with communication. we sent out automated calls last week. we told our customers that it would be a long duration event. we told our customers better would be the potential for extended period of power lost throughout the metro area. we told our customers last week that it was critical clabber preparation plant, and emergency preparedness plan for their family. and for businesses as well as residential parentso we have tried to be more transparent and communicate with our customers. that way people have an expectation of what to expect and can make plans accordingly. >> than
experts predict considerable flooding in an area that has little elevation. last year, irene, and driving through the wall street area. now, last year, you and i were standing almost exactly here to get a very different situation. the surge isn't going to bring just water. it's going to bring force. and that's why we don't know how it will affect an area like this already in evacuation. people aren't living in the area where we are right now. if the forecasters, not you, sam, but everybody in general, close to accurate, this place is going to look very different tomorrow. maybe permanently. >> chris, we're standing right here where the water is up on the edge. last year where we were here, the water was two or fee below that. didn't really get to the top until the middle of the storm. >> absolutely. >> amy. >> chris, sam, thanks so much. we want to take a look at times square. because normally at this hour, it's crammed with traffic. well, look at that, it is a virtual ghost town. sandy has forced officials to shut down the subways for the second time in its history. josh is out on times
from hurricane irene last year are -- taking these warnings very seriously this time around. further inland they're bracing for the possibility of heavy snow in west virginia, pennsylvania, and as far inland in fact, as ohio. there is a large swath of the country that need to keep an eye on this thing. not just the coastal areas. as far inland as ohio. >> huge ramifications on halloween, dubbing it frankenstorm. >>> trying to predict where the storm is going to go next. all different patterns. >> we don't know 100%. accuweather meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the latest. jim. >> good morning, rob, paula. here its hurricane sandy, a large storm system, center of circulation moving its way northwest out of the, out of the bahamas. will continue to hug the coast of florida here. not making direct landfall. on florida. but still lashing the coast, with some heavy rain through the day, today, through the weekend, hug the coast of the carolinas. makes a turn more to the north-northeast. flooding rainfall potentially. outer banks, north carolina. coastal south carolina
. >> reporter: it's like combining the destructive power of hurricane irene, which did $14 billion in damage last year, with the punishing nor'easter of 2009 that brought catastrophic flooding. and then, add in a freezing cold winter temperature, all in one storm. >> this storm is going to be destructive, historic and unfortunately, life-threatening. >> reporter: another fear, the extreme coastal surge that's expected. anywhere from 4 to 10 feet. areas like washington, d.c. are already vulnerable to flooding, and because of the full moon monday, which means higher than normal tides, places like atlantic city could see a swamping ten-foot storm surge. that's possible for new jersey and new york, where evacuation orders may be enforced in coastal areas. even new york city's subways are at risk of flooding. mayor bloomberg says they may be closed as sandy approaches. for more on the damage sandy is already doing, we go up the florida coast to ginger zee. ginger? >> reporter: sam, cocoa beach is one of the widest beaches in florida, but not tonight. it's been cut in half thanks to the breakers c
's why it's been called a billion dollar storm. capable of causing more imagine than hurricane irene last year. the height of the storm should be tuesday, and it will take its sweet time making an exit. turning in the atmosphere over the same spots for five or six days. now, depending on where you live, it may bring up to six inches of rain, 80-mile-per-hour wind gusts, 20 to 30-foot high seas and extreme coastal flooding. it's all during a full moon, too, when tides are even higher. it could even bring half a foot of heavy, wet snow as far inland as ohio. >> 60% chance that sandy will hit us. >> reporter: that's why east coast emergency management teams are gearing up and extra help is being brought in from other states. emergency officials up and down the east coast are warning people that you can't wait. you have to get your emergency kilts and emergency plans in place now. diane? >> ginger, thank you so much. now abc's weather editor sam champion is here. show us these giant forces of nature. >> reporter: superstorm, monster storm. this has three ingredients. first of all, you have sa
and check in on her neighbor. >> let me take a chance. we left for irene and we felt we didn't really have to go. so that's why we stayed. >> a flashlight. >> i don't have one. >> reporter: but nightfall brought regret. the power is out. the water outside rising. >> it is 6:55 and the power just went out. so we're officially screwed. >> reporter: "20/20" producers are here with mary when they spot flames down the block lighting up the flooded streets. they flee to a rooftop they hope will be safe. >> there's water everywhere, and embers flying. >> it's like the apocalypse. i mean there's like that fire. we've evacuated. this is real. >> reporter: this is a community that has been hit hard before losing 32 people on 9/11. today, residents stoically faced their newest disaster, vowing they will come back again. elizabeth vargas, abc news, breezy point, queens. >> thank you so much, elizabeth, and elizabeth will have more tonight on our special edition of "20/20" the perfect storm at 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight. coming up right here our sam champion here, what he saw in this storm he says he h
there near lincoln center. you heard so many people say -- "is this going to be like irene?" hit last august. this storm crushed irene. absolutely no comparison. pieces of buildings falling in the street like that one there. >> you saw the tree. at my family's home, we're okay, just -- and the debris that is flying. that we have to look out for. >> the lower end of manhatta
expected to hit here but to hit here hard. we look at the video from where irene hit this area last year. you can see that the sand mounds and the seawalls that are intended to be the front line for defense for the storm, they were no match for the heavy rains and winds. water just poured right in. as a result, there was massive flooding, mandatory evacuations. and people in this area, bracing, preparing themselves for the worst. sam? >> thank you, linsey. thank you, ginger. if you've seen the spaghetti models, they're turning this thing towards the coastline. a lot of terms are out there. joking terms like frankenstorm are used. we turn to bernie rayno from accuweather. when you look at hear the terms, how much of it is hype on this storm? and how much is very real? >> when you've been in this field as long as you and i have been, sam, you look for a way out when you see a storm that's projected to be this strong. but unfortunately, i don't believe there is a way out. this is not being overhyped. i would use the terms devastating and historic. a 1 in 30-year storm. or even in the fact o
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15